Friday, 26 October 2012

The Blue Sausage Tree - Decaisnea fargesii





Who says that sausages don't grow on trees?


Also known as the Blue Bean - the names refer to the bizarre fruits, that really look like they're from another planet!

The blue sausages you see are indeed edible! Open one up and you will find lots of large black seeds covered in slimy flesh. My favourite way to eat them is to open the pod like a broad bean and take a mouthful of flesh and seeds, then spit out the seeds, which are very hard. The flesh has a sweet and delicate flavour, it reminds me a little of watermelon. It is more of a novelty fruit than a staple crop but it makes a fascinating and beautiful little tree.

I feasted on lots of blue sausages at the Plants for a Future sight in Cornwall. They're ripe in September, and the tree is often heavy with fruit. I saved the seed and have germinated many little seedlings in July - they are 10-15cm tall now and have done really well given the short growing season I gave them.

This tree grows quickly up to about 4m x 4m, sometimes it can also form a shrub.  They are easy to grow, being very hardy, but need a moist soil with reasonable drainage. It's better to offer them a little shade and compromise fruiting than to allow the ground to dry out in full sun.

If you're interested in growing the blue sausage tree, I'd be really happy to provide you with seedlings. I have grown them in root trainers so they should grow away really well. Probably best to plant them outside after the last expected frosts though, as they're still very young.

As always I'd be delighted to swap a plant with you, or for a small sum of your choice! They're self fertile so you only need one tree.








11 comments:

  1. i just bought some seeds... i live in zone 10, what do you say the best way to start these? the instructions said to keep them at 40 degrees for 90 days while germinating!

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  2. Sorry that I missed your question Mariesa! I hope you've already had success with your seeds, but you need to give them 3-4 months in the fridge in slightly moist sand before they'll germinate. Zone 10 will be no problem for this tree!

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  3. Can i get some seeds ill trade you some moonlitowll96@ yahoo.com

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  4. Hi there! I just ate two of those yesterday and kept 15 seeds. I live in Switzerland and was wondering how to best germinate, sow and grow them? Do you have any advise? Thanks alot!!!

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  5. Hi there! I just ate two of those yesterday and kept 15 seeds. I live in Switzerland and was wondering how to best germinate, sow and grow them? Do you have any advise? Thanks alot!!!

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  6. Hi, do you have any seeds available?

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  7. I would swap with you. I have moringa seeds, lavender seeds, rosemary seeds, basil seeds, and also have Sunchoke/Jerusalem Artichoke tubers. Email me: asteedman.med@gmail.com. type plants or something like that on the subject line, so I don't think it's junk mail. ;) I would love a live sausage plant. I am trying to cold stratify pawpaw seeds and I know blue sausage seeds require this as well. I've never gotten seeds to grow which required this process so a live plant is much preferred.

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  8. I saw in another post that you already have Jerusalem Artichokes.... I also have saffron crocus bulbs.

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  10. hi i've tried to germinate then and i've failed... i fallow all steps. first cold stratification fallowed from harm .... still nothing... anyone knows if they are ight sensitive the seeds, (silgomes.oficina@yahoo.com).
    if anyone want to trade seeds you can count with me :)

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  11. I have one at home but it only produces flowers and no fruit. please contact me at gimlee67@outlook.com

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